Pierre C. Rumpf | Manchester-by-the-Sea Real Estate, Effex Real Estate, Beverly Real Estate


Photo by Alexas Fotos via Pixabay

Moving to a new city is an exciting time, but it can also be stressful. Getting the lay of the land, especially if you don't have contacts in the city, is intimidating. From figuring out your transportation options to learning where the most affordable grocery store is, you have many things to tackle to get comfortable in your new space. Here are some tips that may make the transition just a little easier.

1. Join a Group or Organization

Do you have a favorite hobby? Is there a charitable cause you’re passionate about? Find the local group, and join. If you don’t have a favorite hobby or charity, find out about groups or clubs in your city that sound interesting, and join. You’ll be able to connect with people who have similar interests, and making local contacts will help you start learning your city.

2. Say “Yes”

When an opportunity presents itself, say, “yes.” Whether it’s coffee with a new acquaintance or a volunteer opportunity through the group you joined, the more times you can get out into the community and explore its offerings, the more connected you will feel. You only have to say, “yes,” the first time you’re invited, but be willing to step out and experience life in the community.

3. Walk the Streets

While public transportation or your own vehicle are convenient ways to get around the city, they aren’t always the best way to learn its layout. Grab a map, or your GPS on your phone, and start walking. Of course, keep safety and walkability in mind, but if you can, take a walk for your next errand. This will give you the best possible feel for the layout and vibe of the city, and also a more realistic idea of how far away various features are. It will also give you more opportunities to meet the people around you.

4. Find “Your” Spot

Find a place where you can go to hang out when your home or apartment starts to feel confining. This may be a coffee shop, library, or local restaurant, depending on your tastes. When you need to get out, go to your spot. Soon you will become a “regular,” people will start looking for you, and you just might make some friends!

Most importantly, give yourself time. It takes time to get comfortable in a new city, and that’s OK. If you use these tips, you will make some friends, and soon be able to enjoy life in your new community.


After you buy or sell a house, you may have only a short amount of time to relocate to a new address. As such, it helps to plan ahead for moving day. Because if you start preparing for your move right away, you can budget accordingly.

There are many moving costs you need to account for as you prepare to relocate, and these expenses include:

1. Packing

The costs of moving boxes, packing tape and other packing supplies can add up quickly if you are not careful. Fortunately, if you consider what you will require so you can pack your belongings, you may be able to minimize your packing costs.

Oftentimes, you can repurpose cardboard boxes for appliances and use them for moving day. If you have empty cardboard boxes for appliances you purchased, you may be able to re-use these boxes during your move.

You also may want to reach out to local supermarkets. In some instances, grocery stores have empty cardboard boxes and bubble wrap that they no longer need. And in these cases, you can pick up assorted supplies that you can use to get ready for your upcoming relocation.

2. Storage

If you have a large collection of items but do not have a place to keep them at your new address, there is no need to stress. In fact, you can rent a storage unit to keep these items safe until you are ready to bring them to your new home.

A storage unit is valuable for those who are moving to a temporary location until they find a permanent house. Or, you may want to rent a storage unit if you still unsure about which items you want to bring to your new residence.

There is no shortage of storage unit providers in cities and towns nationwide. If you shop around, you can find a storage unit company that offers you the space you need to keep your items safe for the time being.

3. Travel

If you want expert help on moving day, you may want to hire a moving company. That way, you can work with a moving company that can accommodate your moving day requests at a budget-friendly price.

Of course, you should account for travel costs associated with food and fuel, too. And if you are relocating from one state to another, you also may need to account for hotel costs as part of your travel expenses.

If you are uncertain about how to prepare for moving day, you may want to consult with a real estate agent as well. In addition to helping you buy or sell a house, a real estate agent can help you plan for moving day. Best of all, he or she can offer tips to help you seamlessly relocate from one location to another.

Create a moving day budget – you will be happy you did. If you account for the aforementioned moving expenses, you can avoid the risk of spending beyond your means to get ready for moving day.


Finding the ideal moving company to help you transport your belongings from Point A to Point B should be simple. However, no two moving companies are identical. And if you select an inferior moving company, you may encounter many problems when moving day arrives.

Lucky for you, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of finding the perfect moving company.

Now, let's take a look at three red flags to consider when you evaluate moving companies.

1. Lack of Experience

Search for moving companies that boast many years of experience – you'll be happy you did.

Moving companies that possess comprehensive industry experience understand the ins and outs of moving day and may be better equipped than rivals to deliver the best results.

Typically, a moving company that has extensive industry experience will employ friendly, knowledgeable professionals. This business also will provide fair prices and personalized support, ensuring you can get the assistance you need to seamlessly and effortlessly get your personal belongings to your new address.

2. No Licensure or Insurance

Regardless of whether you're moving within the same state or out of state, it is paramount to employ a licensed, insured moving company. By doing so, you can minimize risk of damage or destruction of your personal belongings.

Remember, a moving company will be responsible for transporting your appliances, electronics, furniture and other items to a new location. And if you fail to employ a licensed, insured moving company, you might struggle to protect your belongings in the event of an accident during transport.

Ask moving companies for verification of licensure and insurance. This will enable you to work with a moving company that will do everything possible to safeguard your belongings on moving day.

3. Poor Customer Reviews

What are past customers saying about a moving company? Take a look at customer reviews, and you can gain a better understanding of what it's like to work with a moving company.

In many instances, an online search of a moving company will allow you to learn how this business stacks up against the competition. Or, a moving company may even provide customer reviews on its website.

Of course, don't hesitate to reach out to a moving company to ask for client referrals, either. This will enable you to obtain first-hand insights from previous customers so you can select a moving company that will meet or surpass your expectations.

For recent homebuyers or home sellers, your real estate agent may be able to help you identify moving company red flags as well.

A real estate agent understands the challenges associated with moving day. As such, he or she may be able to help you find a top-notch moving company and ensure you are fully prepared for your upcoming move.

When it comes to finding a moving company, there is no need to worry. Consider the aforementioned warning signs, and you should have no trouble choosing a first-rate moving company to help you out on moving day.


When a house is sold, it’s generally expected that the seller will take all of their personal belongings along with them. This includes furniture, pictures, cleaning supplies, and appliances that weren’t included on the deal. This is all in the expectation that the buyer will have a clean property to move into. 

If a seller does leave personal property behind, what are the rights of the buyer? Buyers may wonder if they can move in and actually take possession of the home if belongings have been left behind. There are a few reasons that buyers may leave property behind including:

  • The item is actually a fixture and not considered personal property
  • The item could belong to a tenant (or former tenant)

In these circumstances, each state determines different rights and procedures that must happen in order for the property to be secured without hassle by the buying party.


What If There’s So Much Stuff It Impedes On Moving In?


In the case that a seller has left so many things that a buyer cannot even comfortably move into the property, the contract may be refused. If there’s an inordinate amount of furniture, trash, and personal belongings, you certainly have a good argument to not sign the final contract for the property. Your rights as a buyer do, however, depend on what exactly was written into the purchase contract for the home you’re buying. 

Hidden Items

If an item has been deemed hidden or buried, the buyers have a different circumstance on their hands. Many times, a buyer is obligated to hang onto these items for the seller. The items were not technically abandoned by the seller to the buyer. The buyer becomes what is called a “bailor,” or a keeper of the property, who needs to be an agent in the change of possession of the items.  

Possession Unknown

If the ownership of an item is unknown, the terms of the contract are held up. Standard contracts generally state that any items left behind by the seller have been forfeited to the buyer. If the contract says nothing about personal property, the buyer generally takes on the role of “bailor” again in this instance.

If The Property Owner Has Died Or The Property Has Been Abandoned


If a property has been abandoned due to foreclosure or bankruptcy, or the property owner has died, any personal property that is left behind is a bit more of a risk for both parties. These circumstances generally state that a buyer will be taking on a property “as is” and essentially anything left is the buyer’s problem. 


If a property owner has died, the executors generally take on the responsibility of removing items from the property to be distributed to the rightful beneficiaries. Occasionally, this process doesn’t work out due to family quarrels. In this case, personal property of the seller goes into the category of forfeiture. 

Personal property is just one reason why you need to understand your legal rights when you’re buying a home.




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