Pierre C. Rumpf | Manchester-by-the-Sea Real Estate, Effex Real Estate, Beverly Real Estate


Deciding on flooring for your home sounds boring. No one wants to research and compare all the different options, but the floors get used more than just about everything else in your home. So, spending some time looking into what flooring will be the best value for you is a wise investment of time. Get ready to take on an adventure of comparing and sorting through all the different flooring options in today’s market. 

No Flying Carpets Here

Carpeting may seem like a simple choice, when in fact there is a lot to consider when it comes to wall-to-wall carpeting. Determine where you would like to use carpet, and how much traffic there will be on a daily basis. Some types of carpeting such as loped Berber handle high traffic flow well. Carpet made from nylon, a man-made material, is excellent for heavy usage areas. Other carpet materials such as wool and olefin are also high traffic area carpet materials that give you a good value for your dollars spent. The straight cut pile and plush styles of carpeting are both softer then loop and are great for bedrooms and lighter traffic areas. 

Knock on Wood; or Something Like It

If you or your family member suffer from allergies carpeting may not be the best choice; in that case, you certainly may want to look into hardwood or engineered wood. Hardwood, as the name implies, is durable wood planks. This option comes in lots of color and shade choices but can be costly for larger projects. Hardwood is easy to clean and a substantial long-term investment. Engineered wood is a durable choice and a bit less expensive than hardwood. Moisture can cause hardwood to warp over time, whereas engineered wood can handle the humidity a bit better. 

Not Your Grandparent’s Laminate

Laminate flooring is the least expensive out of the above choices can also be advantageous to a household with allergies. Also, easily cleaned and maintained, but resistant to fading, laminate comes in a wide selection and design options. You can acquire a laminate that looks like hardwood or other higher-end flooring materials while keeping within a modest budget. With laminate materials you can be creative with color and patterns, adding a custom look to any room. 

Look through open houses in your area and see what kind of flooring choices others have used throughout their homes.


When selecting an area rug, several factors will go into determining the size, shape, material, and even the thickness you want. Just like buying a home, it is all about location, location, location. Ask yourself these questions:

- Where will you use the rug?

- How much traffic does that room get?

- Must it hold up to wet shoes and outdoor debris?

- Will there be food in the room?

- Are pets likely to sleep on the rug?

- Will your children play on the rug?

- Do you like to sit or lie down on the rug?

Location

If your rug is in a formal living room, a hand-tufted silk or wool rug might work, but if the carpet graces your family room, where the kids and pets will play on it, nylon or viscose are more durable fabrics. Also, some family members might find the wool in a rug scratchy on bare legs and arms.

High traffic areas such as an entry or hallway, or a busy family room might benefit from sisal or jute if no one wants to sit on them. Moreover, either sisal or jute under a table where crumbs can filter between the spaces in the weave is probably not useful.

Size and shape

In the case of rugs, size matters and bigger is better. If a rug is too small, it chops up your design. The perfect size can pull everything together into a cozy space. When sizing up your carpet needs, consider the room’s orientation. If the room is a rectangle, but you want your sitting area to be a square with a walkway behind the sofa, opt for a square rug. In breakfast nooks, use a round or octagonal rug under a round or octagonal table. Use square under a pub table too. If your dinette is oblong or oval, a rectangular rug is best.

- In the dining room, choose a rug size with at least two or three feet beyond each side of the table to allow for pulling out chairs. Most formal dining tables need a rug that is eight feet wide or wider to accommodate the larger chairs.

- In your living room, leave at least a one-foot space between the edge of the rug and the walls. Your carpet should be large enough that at least the front feet of your main furniture pieces can rest on the rug.

Pile or thickness

When determining the thickness or pile, consider whether a piece of furniture will fit entirely on the rug or be partially off it. If the pile leaves the front feet higher than the back, seating might feel awkward. 

If you need help deciding which rug will best fit in your new home, talk to a design specialist at a local carpet store.


Hardwoods, tile, and finished concrete make beautiful floor finishes, but to pull your look together, you want texture and the warmth a vintage rug brings. When buying a vintage carpet, here are a few things to which you should pay attention.

Know where it goes

Depending on where the placement, a rug can take a great deal of abuse from foot traffic, pets, moving furniture and the like. If your carpet goes in a high traffic area, look for a sturdy rug to withstand it. On the other hand, if a decorative piece is what you need, don't be afraid of a vintage carpet that shows a little wear.

Know what to look for

In general, pay attention to these areas:

Fraying: Handmade, woven rugs might unravel when frayed edges and loose fringes catch or pull. Look for tight binding. Avoid loose fringes or hems and make sure the backing remains attached.

Knots: Depending on its style, technique, origin, and age, the knots in vintage rugs might range from far-apart and loose to close and tight. In general, the tighter the knot, and the closer together or more knots per square inch, the higher grade and quality the rug. Look on the backside to see the knotting. If knots appear too loose or knap is missing, the carpet may not withstand a high traffic area or the rigors of a vacuum cleaner.

Vintage rugs typically show wear and imperfections unless it came from years of protective storage. Uneven piling, worn patches, discoloration, and even slight stains add to the vintage charm and reveal its storied past.

Know how to care for it

That antique blend of dust and years of household odors might seem more apparent when you get your vintage purchase home. Before you do anything else, air your rug out of doors to get rid of most of the musty odor. Gently beat your rug with a rug beater or broom to remove surface dust.

Recheck the rug for any loose knots and tighten them. Look for any frayed areas that you missed (or determined were minor) and tighten them by hand.

If your rug’s odor persists, enlist the help of a professional rug cleaning service to have it dry cleaned.




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